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http://www.goreyguardian.ie/news/kilmuckridge-the-big-winners-1680595.html
Gorey Gaurdian, Wednesday March 18 2009

KILMUCKRIDGE and Wexford Drama Groups were the big winners at the culmination of the Wexford Drama Festival.

A packed Dun Mhuire theatre enjoyed Bridge Drama Group’s production of ‘Same Old Moon’ on Friday night, which brought to an end the eight night run of the very successful 47th Wexford Drama Festival.

The first award, the Audience Cup, was presented to Paul Walsh of Wexford Drama Group by patron, Dick Trappe for their production of ‘Holy Day’.

The Tomás Murray Award for best newcomer, was presented by Mary and Aoife Murray to Kilmuckridge Drama Group’s Peter Corboy for his role as Johnny Boyle in ‘Juno and the Paycock’. The Lorcan Kiernan Cup for Best Performance by a Wexford actor went to Fergal Kelly, of the Bunclody/Kilmyshall Drama Group.

Wexford Drama group got an Adjudicators Award for Lighting, Sound and Costumes, as did Kilrush for a wonderful scene in ‘A Skull in Connemara’ and Kilmuckridg e for ‘Juno and the Paycock’.

In the Confined section Best Set went to Castlebridge’s Bridge Drama Group, while overall Kilrush came third with ‘A Skull in Connemara’, the Bridge Players came second with ‘Same Old Moon’ and Kilmuckridge were crowned Confined champions with Andy Doyle also winning Best Producer for ‘Juno and the Paycock’.

In the Open Section Wexford Drama Group won Best Set, while overall Bunclody/ Kilmyshall Drama Group came third with ‘The Wake’, the Estuary Players came second with ‘The Last Days of Judas Iscariot’ and the overall Open section winners were Wexford Drama group for their production of Andrew Bovell’s ‘Holy Day’, with Wexford’s Paul Walsh also winning Best Director.

The Granard Connection

I rang Margot Gearty today, the daughter of Larry Kiernan, Granard, who was son of Peter Kiernan and brother of Kitty Kiernan. Peter’s sister, Rose Ann was my Great-Grandmother, and my Grandfather was called Peter. We had a lovely chat and it was good to make the connection between these families again after so many decades. Margot is very bright, articulate, and awake to family history. After our call she very kindly wrote the following peice to help our understanding.

The Granard Connection

Every family has its own unique history. My own particular connection to Granard began the day my grandfather Peter Kiernan walked to Granard in the early 1870s to seek his fortune. Being a younger son, he left his home in the townland of Aughagreagh which is about five miles west of Granard. His family had worked a small farm there for many generations and continue to do so up to the present day.

Within ten years of learning his trade in the grocery/hardware business in Granard, Peter was ready to fulfil his dream of owning his own place. But meanwhile, and most significantly, he had met the woman who would be his wife, his friend and support for the rest of their lives together. Bridget Dawson, of Cloncovid, and Peter Kiernan were married in the old church of Mullahoran, Co. Cavan on October 4th 1886.

Business flourished in their new premises ‘The Corner House’ Granard.  Bridget, the Cavan woman, was shrewd and diplomatic while Peter was popular, respected and had a flair for business. A photograph from the Lawrence Collection (late 1890s) shows a thriving and lively three-story premises in a busy town.

The Kiernan family (from left) Lily, Helen, Bridget, Maud, Catherine, Peter, Rose, Christine, and Larry's foot in stirup

The Kiernan family (from left) Lily, Helen, Bridget, Maud, Catherine, Peter, Rose, Christine, and Larry's foot in stirup

Having lost their first baby at birth in December, 1887, Bridget gave birth the following year to twin girls Lily and Rose. After them came Christine, Lawrence Dawson, Catherine (Kitty), Helen and Maud in quick succession. The family remembered nothing but happiness from the years that followed. Twenty years later (1921) Kitty would write to her ‘very dear Micheal’

I’d love to feel you wanted me always beside you just the way Daddy and Mother used to be (Extract from Dermot Keogh and Gabriel Doherty. Michael Collins and the Making of the Irish State. Cork.1998. P.38)

Family folklore has it that after a busy day in the shop, the money counted and the children in bed, Peter would take Bridget into ‘the snug’ for a nightcap together. On the night of the 31st March 1901 he must have felt a happy and fulfilled man as he recorded on his census form that seventeen people resided in his home – his wife and seven children, six shop assistants and two domestic servants. He was also in 1899 elected as a member of Longford County Council.

The porch of the Greville Arms Hotel from an old photograph

The porch of the Greville Arms Hotel from an old photograph

Peter and Bridget purchased the Greville Arms Hotel after it’s proprietor William Mullen died in 1903. He also bought the shop next door which later became Kiernan Stores which stocked everything (according to adverts) ‘from a needle to an anchor’. Despite all these advances however, there was great cause for anxiety. In 1907 nineteen year old Rose was sent off to a sanatorium in Davos, Switzerland in the desperate hope of a cure for her tuberculosis. It was not to be. She died there in a strange land, while her twin sister Lily, too ill for treatment, died at home in Granard on 27th November 1907. Exactly a year later, their mother Bridget died suddenly – her life cut short at only forty five years. Two months later Peter himself died on January 19th 1909.

Their only son Larry (my father) had to return home from St. Mel’s College, Longford to take over the running of this little empire at only seventeen years old. His older sister Chris stayed at home in Granard to help him while Kitty, Helen and Maud were sent by their guardian – their uncle Andrew Cusack – a draper in Granard (where Durkins reside now), to a new experimental school for girls at Cullenswood House, Ranelagh, Dublin. This school was St.Ita’s ,(a sister school to St. Enda’s school for boys in Rathfarnham) – both of which had as their director Padraig H. Pearse, BA, Barrister-at-Law. Sadly, this school closed down in 1912 and the girls all returned home to Granard. Each took responsibility for one or other aspect of their expanding business. A new era for the family had begun.

The following few years have been well documented. Suffice to say that the family settled down to hard work and a variety of social activities bringing with them the creative skills and broad education they had had both at Loreto and at St. Ita’s.  Many suitors came on the scene for the four girls but it is Kitty’s blossoming romance with Michael Collins that concerns us here. This was a high profile love affair with hundreds of letters being exchanged between the two – the first being written by Collins in February or March 1919 – the last from Kitty on 17th August 1922.

For the purpose of this article I have included two letters from Michael Collins which have references specifically to Granard and County Longford. Despite the great affairs of State with which he was involved these letters show that he could still take time to show his interest not only in Kitty but in the minutia of life and business in a small midland town.

In one such letter, written on 8th November, 1921, having just arrived back in London for the Conference on the Treaty, he tells Kitty he has just been to at 8a.m.Mass and lit a candle for her. He continues

How did you get on yesterday?. Granard Market is held on an ill-chosen date.Monday – how could anyone be in a proper mood or manner for buying or selling on Monday morning? Of course this is the real explanation of the late hour of starting – isn’t it? Anyway I hope the day was not very strenuous for you and that you got through all right. Let me know please. ( Leon O’Broin. In Great Haste .The letters of Michael Collins and Kitty Kiernan. Dublin 1983)

Then in reply to a letter from Kitty written on May 22nd 1922 telling him of the death of Joe McGuinness (of Longford) whom she describes as “a very genuine sort of man and I liked him very much and got on well with him” Collins writes:-

He is a great loss to us, but apart from that I feel the personal loss much more keenly.He was the one responsible for the recent peace. (ibid)

In Great Haste: The letters of Michael Collins and Kitty Kiernan, Leon O’Broin. Dublin, 1983

In Great Haste: The letters of Michael Collins and Kitty Kiernan, Leon O’Broin. Dublin, 1983

Towards the end the letters become more somber. Collins and Kitty write to each other of Harry Boland’s death – each stricken by the tragedy and thinking back without bitterness on happier times. Kitty prays all day and goes with Larry to the funeral. Then came Arthur Griffith’s death. Someone has told Kitty, she writes to Collins ‘that if you go to the funeral to-morrow you will be shot, but God is very good to you, and we must do Lough Derg sometime in thanksgiving.

But it was not to be. The awesome tragedy of Collins death at Beal na Blath on August 1922 was the final grief for Kitty, her devastation total. Instead of the planned double wedding – Maud married Gearoid O’Sullivan in October of the same year – Kitty sat by her sister dressed in black from head to foot. My parents Larry and Peggy married in January, 1923 but Kitty does not appear in any of the photos. She lived with them in Granard for a few months, sitting in the drawing-room responding to the thousands of letters she received from Ireland and abroad. When she left to stay with Maud and take up a small government position, she seldom returned. The Pain of the memories was too great. In 1925 she married a friend and colleague of Collins – Major General Felix Cronin and had two sons.

I was born into the Greville Arms in 1933, the youngest of four children of Peggy and Larry. While having a rich and vibrant childhood we were touched by the spirit of the past. As we ate our meals in the coffee room, the framed eyes of Michael Collins and Arthur Griffith looked down upon us from handsome framed portraits on the walls. We children had black-bordered mortuary cards of Michael Collins in our prayer books. When we had measles and mumps the two impressive volumes of ‘Michael  Collins’- by Pieras Beaslai were eagerly read.

Book in which Margot's fuller article appears

Book in which Margot's fuller article appears.

Old family friends from ‘the Movement’ some by now government ministers or people in high office in the new state – called regularly and spoke of ‘the girls’ in hushed tones. ‘The girls indeed came themselves with their children, bringing excitement and glamour as ever. In 1940 Helen came back to Granard to die –aged only forty, elegant and lovely to the end. Six months later Maud died of the same ailment. Kitty lived only a few more years (1945) and was buried near the grave of Michael Collins at Glasnevin Cemetry. We watched sadly as our parents grieved for ‘the girls’ but on the 22nd December, 1948, a few days before Christmas, my father Larry died suddenly at home and with him the little empire that had been Kiernan’s Stores virtually came to an end. The depression of the 1950s took its toll and the next generation followed other paths. The Hotel changed hands in the early 1960s.

I lived near Granard up to 2004 but still return regularly, sometimes to have lunch in the Hotel or to take my visitors  to climb the Moat. I tell them of Collins letter to Kitty written from Cadogan Square Gardens,London SW, on his birthday 16th October 1921, during the treaty negotiations:

and how I wish I were there now – on the Moat. Last time I was on the Moat, early morning,. Do you remember?  I looked across the Inny to Derryvaragh over Kinale and Sheelin (and thought of Fergus O’Farrell) and turning westward saw Cairnhill where the beacons were lighted to announce to the men of Longford that the French had landed at Killalla. (Ibid)

Margot contributed a fuller article called, ‘the Granard Connection’, to an edited volume, Michael Collins and the Making of the Irish State, edited by Gabriel Doherty and Dermot Keogh. The collection also includes an article about Gearoaid O’Sullivan, friend of Collins and husband of Maud Kiernan.

North Longford Flying Column, 1 May 1921

North Longford Flying Column, 1 May 1921

This photograph comes from Margaret McGuinness’ photostream on Flicker. Thankfully there is a list of the participants, including a Kiernan – maybe Johnny, son of Bernard, who was an IRA Captain at the time.

The accompanying text is as follows:

The North Longford Flying Column on Crott Mountain, 1 May 1921, following an ambush at Reilly’s house at Fyhora, in which two B&Ts were killed.

Rear L-R: Frank Davis, John (Bun) McDowell, Seamus McKeon(bro. of Gen Sean McKeon), Michael Tracey, Paddy Lynch, Tom Reilly, James (Nap) Farrelly, Frank Gormley, Hugh Hourican.

Front L-R: Kiernan(not a member of the column but ‘on the run’ & staying at Reilly’s house), Pat Cooke, Paddy (Bug) Callaghan, Tom Brady, Tom Reddington (Brigade O/C)

Kiernan family, Toome, c.1919

James Kiernan, Mary Frances Kiernan, Rose Ann Kiernan, Patrick Kiernan (Pat the Rat), Rose Ann Kiernan, Larry Kiernan. The photo was taken outside the Kiernan home, in Toome.

We are very grateful to Phyllis Reilly for providing this picture – only one of two we have showing Patrick and Rose Ann Kiernan.

The Bernard Kiernan’s

1 August 2008

Telephone Conversation with Nuala Fox

This was my first contact with Nuala Fox, who I was directed to by a number of people, saying she had a lot of information on Bernard Kiernan’s side of the family.

Nuala is the headmistress of the school at Mullinlaghta and is very friendly and helpful. She explained how she had helped one of our American cousins organise a family reunion for the descendants of Bernard Kiernan, in Lough Gowna.

She said Bernard’s father, Patrick married Mary Reilly, from the family called the ‘Hollow Reillys’, who lived in Kilmore, Dring. Patrick inherited the house from this family. Bernard inherited the house and land from his father; Bernard’s son Johnny stayed on the farm and his son, Noel lives there now.

Nuala said her grandmother was Bernard’s daughter, Lil Kiernan, a member of Cumman-na-mBan. Bernard had two daughters called Kathleen and two sons called Patrick, one each of whom died very young. She said, Eileen’s sons are Seamus and Sean Sorohan. Bridget married a man named Brennan, and his daughter is Kathy Reilly. Jim’s daughter lives in New York and Kathleen’s son lives in Florida. Brian’s daughter, Ann May lives in Granard.

Nuala remembers, uncle Larry very well. She said that he was very warm, into music, and an excellent dancer. She said I should speak with Pat Kehoe, Larry’s neighbour, who would be happy to tell me stories about him.

She told me that Sr Stephen, Delia Kiernan’s daughter, lives in a Louis Convent in Ramsgrange, Co Wexford.

Tom Sheridan & Lorcan Kiernan

Tom Sheridan & Lorcan Kiernan

Tom Sheridan told me that this photo was taken by a Dublin street photographer, in 1946 or 1947. They had journeyed to Dublin for a match in Crooke Park,  in which Wexford played.

http://www.geocities.com/heathcliffiam/mclove.htm

Kitty Kiernan

The story of a love triangle between Michael, Harry Boland (Michael’s best friend), and Kitty is accurate. In 1918, Harry and Michael traveled to Longford where Kiernan and her siblings worked at taking care of the family business in Granard and stayed at the Greville Arms. At this time, Harry was the one dating Kitty and Michael’s interests were directed at Kitty’s sister, Helen. But Helen had another male friend seeking her affections and they eventually married, much to Michael’s dismay.

According to Sean MacEoin, Michael was originally attracted to Helen Kiernan ‘who oozed charm,’ but she was already engaged to a local lawyer, Paul McGovern. Frank O’Connor claimed that ‘on the night before her wedding [Michael] went to her hotel and pleaded with her not to go through with her marriage’ and that during the wedding speeches he was so agitated that he shredded his handkerchief. He then transferred his affections to a second sister, Kitty, with whom Harry Boland was also in love. Kitty had a very pleasing personality: clever, capable, articulate, well groomed, poised, always impeccably dressed, pretty rather than beautiful.  (James MacKay).

The friendship Boland and Collins shared grew as they spent an increased amount of time together and this must have played a role in Collins’ hesitation to go after Kitty immediately. By 1919, Boland was surely in love with her. Michael enjoyed escaping to the country to play tennis, talk, and dance. In the summer of 1920, Harry returned to Ireland from America to take a break. He and Kitty spent time together and when it was time for Harry to leave again, Michael walked Kitty to tell Harry goodbye at his own risk.

Julia Roberts as Kitty, with Collins (Liam Neeson) and Boland (Aidan Quinn), in the 1996 film, Michael Collins

Julia Roberts as Kitty, with Collins (Liam Neeson) and Boland (Aidan Quinn), in the 1996 film, Michael Collins

In 1921, Michael traveled to Granard alone and stayed with Kitty. He invited her to a horse show and they met a number of friends there, Harry included. During the latter part of the year, it was apparent that Harry and Michael were competing for Kitty’s love. Both wrote to her frequently while they were out of the country, Harry being in New York and Collins in London. The correspondence between Michael and Kitty has been recorded in the book In Great Haste, a phrase that usually appeared in the letters. Over time, Kitty chose Michael but it is not clear how she went about breaking off her relationship with Harry.